What’s Hot and What’s Not: the Australian Options online digest Issue 9 July 2014

The Australian Options online digest - July 2014 - What’s Hot and What’s NotPreview Be Sociable, Share! ...

Read More

Gaza Ceasefire Now!

Gaza: Ceasefire Now! On 14 July 2014, the International Trade Union Confederation, representing 176 million workers around the globe, issued a call for an immediate ceasefire in the fighting between Israel and Palestinians in Gaza. The ITUC expressed its full support for the UN Security Council resolution calling for "de-escalation of the situation, restoration of calm, reinstitution of the November 2012 ceasefire and respect for international...

Read More

A new model for fairness in employment

A new model for fairness in employment    John Buchanan  The reality of work in contemporary Australia is hugely different from the conventional narrative that everyone who wants a good job can get one. Instead, limited private sector job growth and deteriorating job security are making employment economically and socially unsustainable. Employment is now the bearer of inequality and unfairness. Output per worker has nearly doubled over the...

Read More

Equality and sustainability: Fundamental to the Australian way of life

Equality and sustainability: Fundamental to the Australian way of life Adam Bandt In this country, we value our work-life balance. In the beautiful land of the ‘fair go’, we traditionally value our time outside work and look after each other. Our country is defined by the beauty of our surroundings, land, sea and air. When we’ve finished work, we go out and enjoy the country. And we have put in place structures and systems, like...

Read More

Debts and Deficits: A Primer

Debts and Deficits: A Primer by Jim Stanford   Introduction: Never Let a Crisis Go to Waste  By any yardstick – international, historical, financial – Australia’s public finances are strong and stable.  There is no question about government’s ability to pay its bills.  Indeed, government could certainly mobilize additional resources to finance expanded public sector activity, if Australians decided that was appropriate.   But...

Read More

Labor Scrapes Back for a Fourth Term in SA

Labor Scrapes Back for a Fourth Term in SA  John Wishart and Jack Humphrys The Result The ALP has won a fourth term after 12 years in office. It will rely on the support of Port Pirie Independent Jeff Brock. Labor won 23 seats, the Liberals 22 and 2 sitting independents were returned. Bob Such, the second independent is likely to support the ALP Government, although he has yet to commit and has dramatically taken a 2 month leave of absence...

Read More

There is still distinct disadvantage in Australia

There is still distinct disadvantage in Australia Dr Valerie Cooms* In the 1960s and 1970s, while Aboriginal people in Queensland were suffering from disease and malnutrition, having their under-award wages confiscated, or being jailed for being lazy, idle, careless or leaving gates open, their bins unwashed or committing adultery, newly decolonised Asian, African, and Pacific nations were watching. For a settler colony like Australia to be...

Read More

Rigoletto; two performances reviewed

Rigoletto2 Michael Browne In March and April I had an opportunity to revisit Rigoletto in two productions. In Brisbane, Opera Queensland restaged a production Lindy Hume had originally directed for New Zealand Opera. Opera Australia premiered their new production of Rigoletto in Melbourne. Musically, the two productions had everything in common – wonderful casts, thrilling singing and superb orchestras in the pit. However, the two...

Read More

Challenging the Orthodoxy: Reflections on Frank Stilwell’s Contribution to Political Economy

Schroeder, Susan K and Lynne Chester eds (2014) Challenging the Orthodoxy: Reflections on Frank Stilwell’s Contribution to Political Economy. Springer: Heidelberg, New York, Dordrecht and London. Readers of Australian Options will be familiar with the work of Sydney political economist Professor Frank Stilwell. This edited book is the outcome of a conference in April 2013 to celebrate and acknowledge Stilwell’s immense contributions to...

Read More

Review of Dog Days Australia After the Boom

Dog Days Australia After the Boom By Ross Garnaut Reviewed by Graham Larcombe Ross Garnaut is one of Australia’s most well-known conventional economists. Unlike many of his academic peers, Garnaut has actively contributed to many of our most complex economic debates including resource taxation, economic liberalization and deregulation, maximizing national benefits associated with the rapid growth of China, and what economic tools should be...

Read More

On the Road to Recognition

On the Road to Recognition Tanya Hosch, deputy campaign director for the growing movement to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia’s Constitution, explains why recognition and removing discrimination from our national rule book matters to every Australian.   On one of the late lingering days of autumn last May, two thousand people turned up to Melbourne’s Federation Square to hear some speeches about a...

Read More

The Abbott Government’s Damning Record

The Abbott Government’s Damning Record  Harold Levien   During the six months since the Coalition achieved government it has pursued an extraordinary mix of behaviours and policies.  Its inaction to major economic events has had disastrous impacts on the future of the economy. It has amended or attempted to remove legislation of the previous government, including the attempted emasculation of the Labor Government’s climate change...

Read More

Editorial: Issue No 76 May 2014

Editorial: Issue No 76 May 2014

Editorial: Out of the West The results of the re-run of the senate election in Western Australia were mixed. Clive Palmer outspent everyone and won a seat; the Greens outspent everyone but Palmer and also won a seat. Labor disrupted themselves and suffered a swing of 5.2 per cent; the Coalition campaigned on the repeal of the carbon tax and the mining tax and suffered a swing of 7.3 per cent. Perhaps the two most important aspects are what it...

Read More

Unravelling universalism in the Budget; Plus vote for the world’s worst boss.

The importance of being earnest By Frank Barbaro Treasurer Joe Hockey’s 2014 Budget delivery on Tuesday 12 May was an earnest public display befitting a solemn and grave task. When announcing government decisions, that widen and deepen misery, anything else would have been unfitting. The privileged are always good at expressing feeling about the pain they cause for others. Budget night’s mood...

Read More

On-line Digest May 2014

Issue 8 May  2014 What’s Hot and What’s Not: the Australian Options online digest The  May edition of the Australian Options Magazine will be  published in the second week of May  2014 with the theme of  Organising for Fairness and the Environment. Articles include Cam Walker on the grassroots success of Lock the Gate, Andrew Dittmer on union strategy, Valerie Cooms on Aboriginal disadvantage, John Buchnan on fairness in...

Read More

The great mistakes: Paul Howes vs social democracy

Paul Howes vs social democracy by Geoff Dow AWU National Secretary Paul Howes announced his resgnation as National Secretary of the Australian Workers' Union in late March. He is  looking for opportunities outside the movement. A 'profile' in the Australian Financial Review coincided with his announcement. According to the profile, Howes vision for the labour movement is to 'embrace capitalism'; similarly, he says that unions 'need to embrace...

Read More

The Great Leap Backward: Criminal Law Reform with the Hon Jarrod Bleijie

Australian Options has published two previous articles about the VLAD Act in Queensland. A comprehensive review and critique of the approach to criminal law reform in Queensland has been published in the Sydney Law Review by Andrew Trotter and Harry Hobbs.   As their asbstract says This article places the reforms in their historical context to illustrate that together they constitute a great leap backward that unravels centuries of gradual...

Read More

Why does Australia need manufacturing industry? .

WHY DOES AUSTRALIA NEED MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY?   Phillip Toner and Frank Stilwell   Australian manufacturing is suffering from a deep-seated and long-standing malaise. The high value of the Australian dollar in the last few years has made it difficult for Australian producers to compete in world markets, so exports have been struggling while domestic markets have been eroded by cheaper imports. The dollar’s fall in recent months has...

Read More

Cartoon from “Sovereign Borders”

The Australian Government is distributing cartoon material in South Asia as part of "Sovereign Borders". One of these cartoon books is available via Australian Customs with the title Storyboard-Afghanistan. It is available here. To say the least, the intent seems to be to confirm Australia as unwelcoming. As a taste here is the first page. Be Sociable, Share! Tweet

Read More

Peace Convergence
 April 20 – 25, 2014 Canberra

    Peace Convergence
 April 20 – 25 2014 Canberra Independent and Peaceful Australian Network
 IPAN is a network of organisations and peace activists from all regions of Australia who are united by our support for an independent Australian foreign policy based on peaceful resolution of conflicts. Website: http://www.ipan.org.au Facebook: www.facebook.com/IndependentAndPeacefulAustraliaNetwork We’re interested in building a...

Read More

Starting to Rebuild – Editorial Jan 2014 Issue No 75

Starting to Rebuild – Editorial Jan 2014 Issue No 75

Beginning to rebuild   After four months some of the directions of the Abbott Government seem clear. Mining before the environment, no help for manufacturing, minimal action on climate change, talk up an economic crisis, scapegoat and humiliate refugees, bluster about spying on the neighbours and blame everything else on the unions and the ALP.   Political theatre and tomfoolery aside, the Government is evidently very determined. It is...

Read More

Trans-Pacific Trade Deal

Divisions over US agenda and social movement opposition may frustrate end game Patricia Ranald* Ministers of the 12 governments involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPPA) negotiations met on December 7-10 in Singapore, with the aim of finalising the agreement by the end of the year. The good news is that they did not succeed in this goal. The bad news is that the Australian government appears to be giving in to some key US demands which...

Read More

Locked Murdoch’s Political Homecoming Salvatore Babones*

If the Coalition victory in September's federal elections showed one thing, it's that it's not your father's Liberal Party anymore. As the party of business and the prosperous middle class, Australia's Liberal Party was founded on values and beliefs that were similar to those of the early US Republican Party. Both parties have always been anti-labor and anti-immigrant, but they are also both heirs to strong traditions of moral decency and...

Read More

Locked The populist PUP purloins poll protest in Queensland by Paul Norton *

The saying “Oppositions don’t win elections, governments lose them” has perhaps never been truer than in relation to the 2013 Australian Federal election. While the Labor primary vote fell by 4.6 per cent, and the Greens by 3 per cent, the Coalition only gained a small swing of  2 per cent. The major primary vote gain was recorded by the right-populist Palmer United Party (PUP) with a spread of micro-parties also increasing their vote...

Read More

Locked What An Abbott Government Means For The Environment Cam Walker*

Anyone who watched the policy debate during the election will know that the campaign was very light when it came to discussion about climate change and environmental issues. The key issue that did surface was, of course, the price on carbon, which Tony Abbott said he would remove as a matter of priority.   This lack of debate would have suited the Coalition, as it came up badly against other major parties in the many policy assessments done...

Read More

From little margins, big margins grow Cambell Klose and Nick Haines * from Cathy McGowan’s campaign

IF YOU head north out of Melbourne and drive for about forty minutes you’ll cross the Great Dividing Range and pass into Indi. This sprawling electorate covers some 28,000 square kilometres – roughly the same area as the US state of Massachusetts. It is a primarily rural region of mountains, rivers, valleys and plains. Within its borders are the Mitta Mitta River, the King River and the Kiewa River – the major catchments of the Murray...

Read More
Skip to toolbar